Late last week, Dr. Oz came under fire when a group of doctors penned a letter criticizing his medical credibility — and today, the TV personality is again fighting back against the jarring comments.

"Without question, the show will survive it," Dr. Oz, 54, said in a new interview on 'Today.' "I want to keep doing the show for as long as I can because I think we played an important role in making America a better place."

dr. oz 'today show'
R/R

Dr. Oz on 'Today' on Friday, April 24, 2015.

On Thursday, April 16, 10 prominent medical professionals wrote an email to Columbia University seeking his removal from the school's college of physicians and surgeons. The note accused Dr. Oz of "promoting quack treatments and cures in the interest of personal financial gain" on 'The Dr. Oz Show,' which first premiered in September 2009.

Related: Dr. Oz Plans to Make Changes Following Harsh Criticism From Congress

"I'm very proud of what we have done on the show. The reality is [that the show] is much broader then a medical lecture series. People don't want to sit there and be hounded about information that's irrelevant to their lives — it's about celebrating life and getting to them where they live," he said of his show's content and viewership.

dr. oz
R/R

Dr. Oz on 'The Dr Oz. Show.'

Dr. Oz continued to explain the series' topics are often different than what a medical professional might tell patients in an office setting because he embraces "unconventional approaches" to medicine, including prayer and "low-tech" remedies.

Watch Dr. Oz's interview on 'Today' in the video below.